YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS Lafayette.

Lafayette Trail

YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS Lafayette

Lafayette Trail

In March of 1825, the citizens of Fayetteville, North Carolina, were honored by a two-day visit from the famous French proponent of liberty and hero of the American Revolutionary War, the marquis de Lafayette. In his speech of welcome, Judge Toomer proclaimed “Never, never can we forget the youthful stranger who, in the darkest hour of adversity, so generously flew to our succor, and so gallantly fought the battle of freedom.”... MORE
In March of 1825, the citizens of Fayetteville, North Carolina, were honored by a two-day visit from the famous French proponent of liberty and hero of the American Revolutionary War, the marquis de Lafayette. In his speech of welcome, Judge Toomer proclaimed “Never, never can we forget the youthful stranger who, in the darkest hour of adversity, so generously flew to our succor, and so gallantly fought the battle of freedom.” Fayetteville had been named for Lafayette by the North Carolina General Assembly in 1783. It was the very first city in America named for him and the only namesake city that he actually visited. In response to Judge Toomer’s speech, Lafayette said of Fayetteville “…upon entering the interesting and prosperous town which has done me the great honor to adopt my name, I can at once admire its actual progress and anticipate its future destinies…”   Marie Joseph Yves Roch Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette, was born in Auvergne, France on September 6, 1757. Although an aristocrat, Lafayette became enamored of the American fight for independence at an early age. In 1777, when only 19, he flaunted convention and royal edicts by sailing to America on a ship he purchased and outfitted with his own funds. After 6 weeks on the high seas, he endured an arduous journey from South Carolina to Philadelphia. There, he presented himself to the Continental Congress and volunteered his services. He was allowed to join the American forces as a major general and became lifelong friends with General George Washington.   Lafayette’s humility, eagerness to learn, enthusiasm for liberty, and courage in battle won him the admiration and friendship of soldiers, officers and statesmen. His battlefield heroics also earned him the admiration of his countrymen in France. This and his petitions to King Louis XVI helped persuade the French monarch to side with America against England and to send money, troops, and supplies. After Lafayette distinguished himself at the Battle of Brandywine, Washington awarded him with command of the Virginia army. He conducted a brilliant campaign against the army of General Cornwallis, maneuvering him into a corner in Yorktown. There, with the forces of Lafayette, Washington and Rochambeau on one side, and the French fleet on the other, Cornwallis had no choice but to surrender. Although the Treaty of Paris was not signed until 1783, the victory at Yorktown essentially decided the war in America’s favor.   After his return to France, Lafayette continued his campaign for liberty. His involvement in the French Revolution eventually led to persecution by radicals on both sides. With arrest and execution by guillotine eminent, Lafayette attempted to flee to England. He was caught by the Austrian army in Belgium and imprisoned for five years. He was freed only after his fame brought worldwide pressure for his release. He was eventually repatriated in France and continued to serve as a fierce advocate of equal rights for all men and the abolition of slavery.   In 1824, as America was preparing to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the Declaration of Independence, President James Monroe invited Lafayette to return as the “Guest of the Nation.” He was welcomed in cities like New York, Boston, and Philadelphia by huge crowds, eager to see one of the last surviving heroes of the American Revolution. He also visited many smaller cities and towns on his tour of all 24 states. Many years before his Grand Tour, Lafayette had been given an engraving of the State House in Fayetteville, North Carolina by a friend who had just returned from America. Touched by his friend’s story of the very first town in America to be named after him, Lafayette decided to include Fayetteville on his tour. Although there were numerous cities and towns at that time that were named Fayetteville or Lafayette or Fayette, this was the only one of those that he visited. The citizens returned the honor with several banquets and receptions and elaborate military reviews. Especially memorable was his reunion with his one of his bodyguards from Yorktown, Isham Blake. Each site along this trail has a bronze marker that captures the importance of each of stops during the tour.   CLOSE
  • YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS Lafayette

    Phoenix Masonic Lodge Number 8

    Hours: Daily before dusk, exterior view only or by appointment

    On March 5, 1825, General Lafayette visited the Phoenix Masonic Lodge at Saint John’s Square. The lodge was located at one of the three public squares. The original lodge at this site was replaced by the current lodge in 1858. Lafayette, like George Washington and so many of the nation’s founding fathers, was a Free Mason. The bronze marker can be found behind the building close to Cross Creek near the path.

    221 Mason Street Fayetteville NC 28301

    VISIT WEBSITE

    (910) 323-0162

    Hours: Daily before dusk, exterior view only or by appointment On March 5, 1825, General Lafayette visited the Phoenix Masonic Lodge at Saint John's Square. The lodge was located at one of the three public squares. The original lodge at this...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  • YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS Lafayette

    Lafayette Historical Marker

    On March 4-5, 1825, was guest of Fayetteville (named for him 1783), staying at home of Duncan McRae, on site of present courthouse.

    Gillespie Street at Franklin Street in Fayetteville

    On March 4-5, 1825, was guest of Fayetteville (named for him 1783), staying at home of Duncan McRae, on site of present courthouse....(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  • YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS Lafayette

    Clarendon Bridge

    Hours: Daily before dusk, exterior view only.

    On March 4, 1825, the Honorable Hutchins G. Burton, Governor of North Carolina, the Honorable John L. Taylor, Chief Justice of the State, Genral William Williams, and Colonel Polk’s Troop of Cavalry from Mecklenburg County and others, escorted Lafayette and his son from Raleigh to Fayetteville. Fayetteville’s Magistrate of Police (Mayor) and Commissioners received and welcomed Lafayette at the Clarendon Bridge. He was then escorted into town by local militia units which included the Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry. The bronze marker is located to the left of entrance to the bridge on the ground.

    Present Day Person Street Bridge Fayetteville NC 28301

    (800) 255-8217

    Hours: Daily before dusk, exterior view only. On March 4, 1825, the Honorable Hutchins G. Burton, Governor of North Carolina, the Honorable John L. Taylor, Chief Justice of the State, Genral William Williams, and Colonel Polk's Troop of Cavalry...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  • YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS Lafayette

    Town House (Market House)

    Hours: Daily before dusk, exterior view only.

    Lafayette was escorted from the Clarendon Bridge to the Town House, which stood at this site. From a stage erected for the occasion, Lafayette addressed the citizens of Fayetteville. The various military units formed lines on each side of the street, and Lafayette’s carriage passed between them amidst the discharge of artillery. This was an appropriate site to receive Lafayette; for in 1789, within the walls of the Town House (then known as the State House), North Carolina had ratified the Constitution of the United States. From the Town House Lafayette was escorted to his place of lodging at the State Banking House. This site is now referred to as the Market House and the bronze marker can be found underneath towards the back on one of the pillars nearest Person Street.

    Intersection of Person and Hay Streets, with Green and Gillespie Streets Fayetteville NC 28301

    (800) 255-8217

    Hours: Daily before dusk, exterior view only. Lafayette was escorted from the Clarendon Bridge to the Town House, which stood at this site. From a stage erected for the occasion, Lafayette addressed the citizens of Fayetteville. The various...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  • YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS Lafayette

    Fayetteville Area Convention and Visitors Bureau (FACVB)

    Hours: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.;

    Open to the public

    The Fayetteville Area Convention and Visitors Bureau (FACVB) positions Fayetteville and  Cumberland County as a destination for conventions, tournaments, and individual travel. Operating a Visitors Center with a drive-through window. The FACVB is located just minutes from the heart of downtown. Signs from I-95 provide clear directions to the Visitor Center. Call for information and help planning your visit to the area or stop by when you arrive for maps, brochures and more.

    245 Person Street Fayetteville NC 28301

    VISIT WEBSITE

    (910) 483-5311

    Hours: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Open to the public The Fayetteville Area Convention and Visitors Bureau (FACVB) positions Fayetteville and  Cumberland County as a destination for conventions, tournaments, and individual travel....(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  • YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS Lafayette

    Liberty Point

    Hours: Daily before dusk. Exterior view only.

    On March 4, 1825, as Lafayette was being escorted into town from the Clarendon Bridge, he passed by Liberty Point. This location is not only a locally cherished historical area but also a vestige of early street patterns with its notable triangular plot. Near this site in June 1775, a group of 55 patriots signed a document of freedom one year before the Declaration of Independence was signed, popularly known as the Liberty Point Resolves. A granite boulder commemorates their pledge to their country as well lists the names of the 55 signers. The bronze marker is located near the granite boulder.

    Person and Bow Streets Fayetteville NC 28301

    (800) 255-8217

    Hours: Daily before dusk. Exterior view only. On March 4, 1825, as Lafayette was being escorted into town from the Clarendon Bridge, he passed by Liberty Point. This location is not only a locally cherished historical area but also a vestige...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  • YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS Lafayette

    Fayetteville and Fayette County (City Hall)

    Hours: Open to the public, Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

    Cumberland County, named in honor of William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, was formed in 1754 from Bladen County. In 1783, the two villages of Cross Creek and Campbellton were combined and named Fayetteville in honor of General Lafayette. Fayetteville became the first city in the United States named for Lafayette, and the only one named for him that he actually visited during his lifetime. In early 1784, Cumberland County was renamed Fayette County, but the act was repealed at the next General Assembly in November 1784. The bronze marker can be found near the flag poles in the front entrance.

    433 Hay Street Fayetteville NC 28301

    (800) 255-8217

    Hours: Open to the public, Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Cumberland County, named in honor of William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, was formed in 1754 from Bladen County. In 1783, the two villages of Cross Creek and Campbellton were combined...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  • YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS Lafayette

    Grave of Isham Blake

    Hours: Daily before dusk, exterior view only.

    Isham Blake, a musician in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War, also served as one of General Lafayette’s bodyguards at the Siege of Yorktown in 1781. The Siege of Yorktown was an American victory by a combined assault of American and French forces led by General George Washington, Marquis de Lafayette, and French General Comte de Rochambeau, over a British Army commanded by General Lord Cornwallis. This surrender caused the British government to negotiate an end to the War. After the War, Blake became a productive and respected citizen of Fayetteville. On the morning of March 5, 1825, Lafayette received a visit from his former body guard. He is now buried in Cross Creek Cemetery I. The bronze marker is at the brick wall across from Evans A.M.E. Zion Church.

    Cross Creek Cemetery I, Cool Spring and Grove Streets Fayettevillle NC 28301

    (800) 255-8217

    Hours: Daily before dusk, exterior view only. Isham Blake, a musician in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War, also served as one of General Lafayette's bodyguards at the Siege of Yorktown in 1781. The Siege of Yorktown...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  • YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS Lafayette

    Lafayette Hotel

    Hours: Daily before dusk, exterior view only.

    On this site stood the first Lafayette Hotel, built by Robert Donaldson in 1824 and was completed in time for Lafayette’s visit in March 1825. It was a Georgian brick structure; three and a half stories high, with a hipped roof, and dormer windows. A glass transom and sidelights framed the main entrance on Hay Street. On the evening of March 4, 1825, a large ball was held in Lafayette’s honor at this newly completed hotel, where the rooms had been decorated with evergreens and flowers. In the late afternoon of March 5, a farewell dinner was held here for Lafayette. The bronze marker is on the building facing Donaldson Street.

    Corner of Hay and Donaldson Streets Fayetteville NC 28301

    (800) 255-8217

    Hours: Daily before dusk, exterior view only. On this site stood the first Lafayette Hotel, built by Robert Donaldson in 1824 and was completed in time for Lafayette's visit in March 1825. It was a Georgian brick structure; three and a half...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  • YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS Lafayette

    Major Robert Strange House

    Hours: Daily before dusk, exterior view only.

    Built in circa 1817, this federal-style house is situated on a commanding site overlooking the city below. Major Strange was the Commander of the Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry, which escorted Lafayette during his visit to Fayetteville. He was also the Master of the Phoenix Masonic Lodge, which entertained Lafayette. Upon Lafayette’s death, Fayetteville held a memorial service at the First Presbyterian Church on July 12, 1834, in which Major Strange delivered an eloquent eulogium on the character and services of Lafayette. The bronze marker is located on the ground to the right of the driveway.

    114 Hale Street Fayetteville NC 28301

    (800) 255-8217

    Hours: Daily before dusk, exterior view only. Built in circa 1817, this federal-style house is situated on a commanding site overlooking the city below. Major Strange was the Commander of the Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry, which...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  • YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS Lafayette

    State Banking House

    Hours: Daily before dusk, exterior view only.

    On the evening of March 4, 1825, Lafayette was lodged at the State Banking House, the residence of Duncan MacRae, esq., which was located on this site. The bank was an imposing structure of heavy stonework and brick. Shortly after arriving, Lafayette appeared on the balcony where citizens were assembled below and was saluted by the military. He then dined in the company of Governor Burton, the several committees, and some of the oldest citizens of the town. This site is now the location of the old Cumberland County Courthouse. The bronze marker can be found on the ground to the left of the stairs.

    130 Gillespie Street Fayetteville NC 28301

    (800) 255-8217

    Hours: Daily before dusk, exterior view only. On the evening of March 4, 1825, Lafayette was lodged at the State Banking House, the residence of Duncan MacRae, esq., which was located on this site. The bank was an imposing structure of heavy...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  • YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS Lafayette

    Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry (F.I.L.I.) Armory and Museum

    Hours: Daily before dusk, exterior view only or by appointment.

    Upon General Lafayette’s arrival on March 4th, 1825, the Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry (F.I.L.I.), under the command of Major Robert Strange, escorted Lafayette from the Clarendon Bridge to the Town House to his place of lodging and continued to escort him throughout his visit. F.I.L.I. is the oldest militia unit in continuous existence in the South. The carriage that Lafayette rode through the streets of Fayetteville is located in the museum. The bronze marker is located in front of the entrance slightly to the left of the door.

    210 Burgess Street Fayetteville NC 28301

    VISIT WEBSITE

    (910) 433-1457

    Hours: Daily before dusk, exterior view only or by appointment. Upon General Lafayette's arrival on March 4th, 1825, the Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry (F.I.L.I.), under the command of Major Robert Strange, escorted Lafayette from...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

THE STOPS

  1. Phoenix Masonic Lodge Number 8
    YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS Lafayette

    Phoenix Masonic Lodge Number 8

    Hours: Daily before dusk, exterior view only or by appointment

    On March 5, 1825, General Lafayette visited the Phoenix Masonic Lodge at Saint John’s Square. The lodge was located at one of the three public squares. The original lodge at this site was replaced by the current lodge in 1858. Lafayette, like George Washington and so many of the nation’s founding fathers, was a Free Mason. The bronze marker can be found behind the building close to Cross Creek near the path.

    221 Mason Street Fayetteville NC 28301

    VISIT WEBSITE

    (910) 323-0162

    Hours: Daily before dusk, exterior view only or by appointment On March 5, 1825, General Lafayette visited the Phoenix Masonic Lodge at Saint John's Square. The lodge was located at one of the three public squares. The original lodge at this...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  2. Lafayette Historical Marker
    YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS Lafayette

    Lafayette Historical Marker

    On March 4-5, 1825, was guest of Fayetteville (named for him 1783), staying at home of Duncan McRae, on site of present courthouse.

    Gillespie Street at Franklin Street in Fayetteville

    On March 4-5, 1825, was guest of Fayetteville (named for him 1783), staying at home of Duncan McRae, on site of present courthouse....(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  3. Clarendon Bridge
    YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS Lafayette

    Clarendon Bridge

    Hours: Daily before dusk, exterior view only.

    On March 4, 1825, the Honorable Hutchins G. Burton, Governor of North Carolina, the Honorable John L. Taylor, Chief Justice of the State, Genral William Williams, and Colonel Polk’s Troop of Cavalry from Mecklenburg County and others, escorted Lafayette and his son from Raleigh to Fayetteville. Fayetteville’s Magistrate of Police (Mayor) and Commissioners received and welcomed Lafayette at the Clarendon Bridge. He was then escorted into town by local militia units which included the Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry. The bronze marker is located to the left of entrance to the bridge on the ground.

    Present Day Person Street Bridge Fayetteville NC 28301

    (800) 255-8217

    Hours: Daily before dusk, exterior view only. On March 4, 1825, the Honorable Hutchins G. Burton, Governor of North Carolina, the Honorable John L. Taylor, Chief Justice of the State, Genral William Williams, and Colonel Polk's Troop of Cavalry...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  4. Town House (Market House)
    YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS Lafayette

    Town House (Market House)

    Hours: Daily before dusk, exterior view only.

    Lafayette was escorted from the Clarendon Bridge to the Town House, which stood at this site. From a stage erected for the occasion, Lafayette addressed the citizens of Fayetteville. The various military units formed lines on each side of the street, and Lafayette’s carriage passed between them amidst the discharge of artillery. This was an appropriate site to receive Lafayette; for in 1789, within the walls of the Town House (then known as the State House), North Carolina had ratified the Constitution of the United States. From the Town House Lafayette was escorted to his place of lodging at the State Banking House. This site is now referred to as the Market House and the bronze marker can be found underneath towards the back on one of the pillars nearest Person Street.

    Intersection of Person and Hay Streets, with Green and Gillespie Streets Fayetteville NC 28301

    (800) 255-8217

    Hours: Daily before dusk, exterior view only. Lafayette was escorted from the Clarendon Bridge to the Town House, which stood at this site. From a stage erected for the occasion, Lafayette addressed the citizens of Fayetteville. The various...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  5. Fayetteville Area Convention and Visitors Bureau (FACVB)
    YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS Lafayette

    Fayetteville Area Convention and Visitors Bureau (FACVB)

    Hours: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.;

    Open to the public

    The Fayetteville Area Convention and Visitors Bureau (FACVB) positions Fayetteville and  Cumberland County as a destination for conventions, tournaments, and individual travel. Operating a Visitors Center with a drive-through window. The FACVB is located just minutes from the heart of downtown. Signs from I-95 provide clear directions to the Visitor Center. Call for information and help planning your visit to the area or stop by when you arrive for maps, brochures and more.

    245 Person Street Fayetteville NC 28301

    VISIT WEBSITE

    (910) 483-5311

    Hours: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Open to the public The Fayetteville Area Convention and Visitors Bureau (FACVB) positions Fayetteville and  Cumberland County as a destination for conventions, tournaments, and individual travel....(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  6. Liberty Point
    YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS Lafayette

    Liberty Point

    Hours: Daily before dusk. Exterior view only.

    On March 4, 1825, as Lafayette was being escorted into town from the Clarendon Bridge, he passed by Liberty Point. This location is not only a locally cherished historical area but also a vestige of early street patterns with its notable triangular plot. Near this site in June 1775, a group of 55 patriots signed a document of freedom one year before the Declaration of Independence was signed, popularly known as the Liberty Point Resolves. A granite boulder commemorates their pledge to their country as well lists the names of the 55 signers. The bronze marker is located near the granite boulder.

    Person and Bow Streets Fayetteville NC 28301

    (800) 255-8217

    Hours: Daily before dusk. Exterior view only. On March 4, 1825, as Lafayette was being escorted into town from the Clarendon Bridge, he passed by Liberty Point. This location is not only a locally cherished historical area but also a vestige...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  7. Fayetteville and Fayette County (City Hall)
    YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS Lafayette

    Fayetteville and Fayette County (City Hall)

    Hours: Open to the public, Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

    Cumberland County, named in honor of William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, was formed in 1754 from Bladen County. In 1783, the two villages of Cross Creek and Campbellton were combined and named Fayetteville in honor of General Lafayette. Fayetteville became the first city in the United States named for Lafayette, and the only one named for him that he actually visited during his lifetime. In early 1784, Cumberland County was renamed Fayette County, but the act was repealed at the next General Assembly in November 1784. The bronze marker can be found near the flag poles in the front entrance.

    433 Hay Street Fayetteville NC 28301

    (800) 255-8217

    Hours: Open to the public, Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Cumberland County, named in honor of William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, was formed in 1754 from Bladen County. In 1783, the two villages of Cross Creek and Campbellton were combined...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  8. Grave of Isham Blake
    YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS Lafayette

    Grave of Isham Blake

    Hours: Daily before dusk, exterior view only.

    Isham Blake, a musician in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War, also served as one of General Lafayette’s bodyguards at the Siege of Yorktown in 1781. The Siege of Yorktown was an American victory by a combined assault of American and French forces led by General George Washington, Marquis de Lafayette, and French General Comte de Rochambeau, over a British Army commanded by General Lord Cornwallis. This surrender caused the British government to negotiate an end to the War. After the War, Blake became a productive and respected citizen of Fayetteville. On the morning of March 5, 1825, Lafayette received a visit from his former body guard. He is now buried in Cross Creek Cemetery I. The bronze marker is at the brick wall across from Evans A.M.E. Zion Church.

    Cross Creek Cemetery I, Cool Spring and Grove Streets Fayettevillle NC 28301

    (800) 255-8217

    Hours: Daily before dusk, exterior view only. Isham Blake, a musician in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War, also served as one of General Lafayette's bodyguards at the Siege of Yorktown in 1781. The Siege of Yorktown...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  9. Lafayette Hotel
    YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS Lafayette

    Lafayette Hotel

    Hours: Daily before dusk, exterior view only.

    On this site stood the first Lafayette Hotel, built by Robert Donaldson in 1824 and was completed in time for Lafayette’s visit in March 1825. It was a Georgian brick structure; three and a half stories high, with a hipped roof, and dormer windows. A glass transom and sidelights framed the main entrance on Hay Street. On the evening of March 4, 1825, a large ball was held in Lafayette’s honor at this newly completed hotel, where the rooms had been decorated with evergreens and flowers. In the late afternoon of March 5, a farewell dinner was held here for Lafayette. The bronze marker is on the building facing Donaldson Street.

    Corner of Hay and Donaldson Streets Fayetteville NC 28301

    (800) 255-8217

    Hours: Daily before dusk, exterior view only. On this site stood the first Lafayette Hotel, built by Robert Donaldson in 1824 and was completed in time for Lafayette's visit in March 1825. It was a Georgian brick structure; three and a half...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  10. Major Robert Strange House
    YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS Lafayette

    Major Robert Strange House

    Hours: Daily before dusk, exterior view only.

    Built in circa 1817, this federal-style house is situated on a commanding site overlooking the city below. Major Strange was the Commander of the Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry, which escorted Lafayette during his visit to Fayetteville. He was also the Master of the Phoenix Masonic Lodge, which entertained Lafayette. Upon Lafayette’s death, Fayetteville held a memorial service at the First Presbyterian Church on July 12, 1834, in which Major Strange delivered an eloquent eulogium on the character and services of Lafayette. The bronze marker is located on the ground to the right of the driveway.

    114 Hale Street Fayetteville NC 28301

    (800) 255-8217

    Hours: Daily before dusk, exterior view only. Built in circa 1817, this federal-style house is situated on a commanding site overlooking the city below. Major Strange was the Commander of the Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry, which...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  11. State Banking House
    YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS Lafayette

    State Banking House

    Hours: Daily before dusk, exterior view only.

    On the evening of March 4, 1825, Lafayette was lodged at the State Banking House, the residence of Duncan MacRae, esq., which was located on this site. The bank was an imposing structure of heavy stonework and brick. Shortly after arriving, Lafayette appeared on the balcony where citizens were assembled below and was saluted by the military. He then dined in the company of Governor Burton, the several committees, and some of the oldest citizens of the town. This site is now the location of the old Cumberland County Courthouse. The bronze marker can be found on the ground to the left of the stairs.

    130 Gillespie Street Fayetteville NC 28301

    (800) 255-8217

    Hours: Daily before dusk, exterior view only. On the evening of March 4, 1825, Lafayette was lodged at the State Banking House, the residence of Duncan MacRae, esq., which was located on this site. The bank was an imposing structure of heavy...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  12. Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry (F.I.L.I.) Armory and Museum
    YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS Lafayette

    Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry (F.I.L.I.) Armory and Museum

    Hours: Daily before dusk, exterior view only or by appointment.

    Upon General Lafayette’s arrival on March 4th, 1825, the Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry (F.I.L.I.), under the command of Major Robert Strange, escorted Lafayette from the Clarendon Bridge to the Town House to his place of lodging and continued to escort him throughout his visit. F.I.L.I. is the oldest militia unit in continuous existence in the South. The carriage that Lafayette rode through the streets of Fayetteville is located in the museum. The bronze marker is located in front of the entrance slightly to the left of the door.

    210 Burgess Street Fayetteville NC 28301

    VISIT WEBSITE

    (910) 433-1457

    Hours: Daily before dusk, exterior view only or by appointment. Upon General Lafayette's arrival on March 4th, 1825, the Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry (F.I.L.I.), under the command of Major Robert Strange, escorted Lafayette from...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

Lafayette Trail
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