YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE TRAIL.

American Independence Trail

YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE TRAIL

American Independence Trail

As one of the original thirteen colonies, North Carolina has a steep and varied Revolutionary history. The fever for independence spiked in communities across the state. Fayetteville’s revolutionary roots include the signing of the "Liberty Point Resolves" by the Cumberland Association; local men serving in the militia and enlisting in the Continental Army; Robert Rowan, an ardent supporter of independence who served in the... MORE
As one of the original thirteen colonies, North Carolina has a steep and varied Revolutionary history. The fever for independence spiked in communities across the state. Fayetteville’s revolutionary roots include the signing of the "Liberty Point Resolves" by the Cumberland Association; local men serving in the militia and enlisting in the Continental Army; Robert Rowan, an ardent supporter of independence who served in the Provincial Congress; and finally, the ratification of the U.S. Constitution at the State House. As you travel the American Independence trail, remember that you’ll drive to places where once only horses and wagons drove. In June 1775, prompted by British actions that included the battles at Lexington and Concord, and “arbitrary impositions,” a group known as the Cumberland Association signed a Committee of Safety document in Fayetteville that has become known as “The Liberty Point Resolves.” Fifty-five men signed this document including Robert Rowan, merchant and entrepreneur who arrived in Cross Creek (later renamed Fayetteville) in the 1760s. Rowan served as a captain of the 1st North Carolina infantry in the Continental Army. Through the colonial period, Robert Rowan’s political activity consisted of numerous terms in the General Assembly and the Provincial Congress, making him a leading spokesman on matters relating to American Independence. Cumberland County witnessed divided loyalties; unique to an area settled by a large population of Scottish immigrants who had taken a loyalty oath to England before deciding to board ships for America. However, many Scottish settlers sided with the Patriots fighting for independence, while many others joined British troops to subdue patriotic fervor. Statistically, pre-1760, Scottish immigrants tended to align with the Patriots or Whigs, and those that settled here after the 1760s were generally Tories also known as Loyalists. A clash between these neighbors occurred in February 1776, when Patriot militia, minutemen, and a few Continentals, including Captain Robert Rowan’s company, engaged the Scottish Highlander Militia at the Battle of Moores Creek Bridge. This three-minute battle squashed the hopes of the British to gather southern support for the Loyalist cause. In 1780, Patriot cavalry camped just north of downtown Fayetteville for observation and other duties for five months. Lord Cornwallis marched his troops through Fayetteville in April 1781, after the Battle of Guilford Courthouse, giving an uneasy feeling to local patriots. Cornwallis counted on Fayetteville Loyalists to offer a place to rest and re-supply his troops. However, he arrived to find that the majority of Loyalists had been run out of the community. The remaining Patriots did not want to accommodate Cornwallis' troops, but he still managed to find a place to bed down for the night. Lord Cornwallis and his red coats left peaceably and headed south toward Wilmington. Six months later on October 19, Lord Cornwallis surrendered at Yorktown. On August 3, 1781, a group of Loyalists that descended on a Patriot camp caught and killed nine Patriot militiamen that had served under General Nathaniel Greene at Guilford Courthouse. This became known as the Piney Bottom Massacre. Following the massacre, local Patriots and Loyalists both engaged in a number of retaliation attacks during the remainder of the war. The location of the Piney Bottom Massacre is inaccessible, because it is part of Fort Bragg. When the war ended, delegates set forth to construct a new government. Upon the drafting of the U.S. Constitution, it was up to each individual colony to adopt, or ratify, this document that embodied rights and amendments. On November 21, 1789, representatives from across the state met in Fayetteville at the State House, ratified the U.S. Constitution, and became the 12th state to join the United States of America. In May 1831, the State House was destroyed by fire along with 600 other structures in one of the cities worse fire disasters. The Market House was built in its place and stands at the same location. As you travel the trail, you will learn about people and discover relationships that give Fayetteville a foothold in America’s Independence. You will see the grave of Isaac Hammond, a free black who was a fifer in the 10th North Carolina Regiment Continental Line and a statue of the Marquis de Lafayette, whose alliance with the Patriots proved vital to America’s victory. Fayetteville can proudly claim the first city in America to name itself for Lafayette and the only city named for him that he visited. Another place-name in Cumberland County also comes from the Revolutionary War—71st Township. The 71st Highlanders was a British regiment that marched through the area and surrendered at Yorktown. Trail Mileage: 35 miles Trail Time to Complete: 1 hour, 10 min (half-day trail) Sites of interest on this trail may be classified in one of three ways: Open to the Public - The site is open to the public for a visit during their operating hours. By Appointment Only - The site is available to visitors anytime by viewing it from the exterior or by calling ahead and making an appointment with its administrators for the site to be opened during your visit. Exterior View Only - The site may only be viewed from the exterior for a visit. Visitors may receive written or audible information about trail sites at the Fayetteville Area Convention and Visitors Bureau through our Customize IT! system.   CLOSE
  • YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE TRAIL

    Old Bluff Church and Cemetery

    Exterior View or By Appointment Only. Daily before Dusk.

    This graveyard is one of the oldest in Cumberland County. It is located adjacent to Old Bluff Church, which was organized in 1758. Both are located on the high east bank of the Cape Fear River. Colonel Alexander McCalister, a leading County patriot during the Revolutionary War, is buried here. He came to North Carolina in 1740 from Scotland and quickly became a great patriot and a prominent figure in North Carolina, becoming a member of the N.C. Senate in 1787. A monument commemorates his many achievements.

    Old Bluff Church Road Wade NC 28395

    (910) 891-5019

    Exterior View or By Appointment Only. Daily before Dusk. This graveyard is one of the oldest in Cumberland County. It is located adjacent to Old Bluff Church, which was organized in 1758. Both are located on the high east bank of the Cape...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  • YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE TRAIL

    Liberty Point

    Hours: Daily before dusk. Exterior view only.

    Near this site in June 1775, a group of fifty-five patriots signed a document of freedom, known as the “Liberty Point Resolves”, one year before the Declaration of Independence was signed. A granite marker commemorates their pledge to the cause of Independence and lists fifty-five signers names. Liberty Point is not only a locally cherished historical area but also a vestige of early street patterns with its notable triangular plot.

    Person and Bow Streets Fayetteville NC 28301

    (800) 255-8217

    Hours: Daily before dusk. Exterior view only. Near this site in June 1775, a group of fifty-five patriots signed a document of freedom, known as the "Liberty Point Resolves", one year before the Declaration of Independence was signed. A granite...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  • YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE TRAIL

    Fifer’s Grave

    Hours: Daily before dusk. Exterior view only.

    The African-American fifer Isaac Hammond lies buried here. Hammond became the first fifer in the Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry and served 30 years. He also served in the 10th NC Regiment Continental Line during the Revolutionary War. He became a barber in town and was active in politics even though blacks were not permitted to vote at the time.

    North Cool Spring Street Fayetteville, NC 28301

    Hours: Daily before dusk. Exterior view only. The African-American fifer Isaac Hammond lies buried here. Hammond became the first fifer in the Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry and served 30 years. He also served in the 10th NC Regiment...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  • YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE TRAIL

    Museum of the Cape Fear Historical Complex

    Hours: Sunday, 1 – 5 p.m.; Tuesday – Saturday, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Closed on Monday. Open to the public.

    Nearly 400 years of history is retold at the Museum of the Cape Fear Historical Complex. The museum’s exhibits provide a larger context to the patriotism and revolutionary activity that occurred in southern North Carolina. The story of patriotism in this area, however, is made more interesting by the presence of Scottish Highlanders, who settled this area beginning in the 1730s. They took a loyalty oath prior to immigrating to the colonies, and the American Revolution divided their loyalties between the desire for independence and their status as British subjects who swore allegiance to the king. These divided loyalties were tested at the Battle of Moore’s Creek Bridge where Scottish patriots met and defeated Scottish Tories. After the Revolution, the State House, in Fayetteville would be the site where North Carolina delegates ratified the U.S. Constitution, making North Carolina the twelfth state to join the Union. A large relief mural of the State House is unique to see.

    A visit through the museum’s American Revolution gallery lifts history from the pages of text books and places you in the midst of the events. The museum’s exhibit creates a clearer understanding of American Independence in the Cape Fear region.

    801 Arsenal Avenue Fayetteville NC 28305

    VISIT WEBSITE

    (910) 486-1330

    Hours: Sunday, 1 - 5 p.m.; Tuesday - Saturday, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Closed on Monday. Open to the public. Nearly 400 years of history is retold at the Museum of the Cape Fear Historical Complex. The museum's exhibits provide a larger context...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  • YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE TRAIL

    Cross Creek Cemetery

    Exterior View Only. Open Daily Dawn to Dusk.

    The oldest public cemetery in Fayetteville, containing over 1,100 grave markers is the burial ground for early settlers and locally significant persons in Fayetteville’s history. This cemetery contains graves of Revolutionary War veterans, including the notable Revolutionary War hero Robert Rowan. He was the leading town patriot as well as the organizer and a signer of the “Liberty Point Resolves”. His burial site is marked by a tall stone monument.

    North Cool Spring Street and Grove Street Fayetteville NC 28301

    (910) 433-1457

    Exterior View Only. Open Daily Dawn to Dusk. The oldest public cemetery in Fayetteville, containing over 1,100 grave markers is the burial ground for early settlers and locally significant persons in Fayetteville's history. This cemetery...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  • YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE TRAIL

    Cornwallis Historical Marker

    Marching to Wilmington after the Battle of Guilford
    Courthouse, stopped with his army in this town in April 1781.

    Green Street in Fayetteville

    Marching to Wilmington after the Battle of Guilford Courthouse, stopped with his army in this town in April 1781....(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  • YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE TRAIL

    Moore’s Camp Historical Marker

    Prior to the Battle of Moores Creek Bridge, forces of Gen. James Moore, Whig commander, camped, Feb. 15-21, 1776, 1 1/2 miles northeast.

    NC 87 South of Fayetteville (at Butler Nursery Road)

    Prior to the Battle of Moores Creek Bridge, forces of Gen. James Moore, Whig commander, camped, Feb. 15-21, 1776, 1 1/2 miles northeast....(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  • YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE TRAIL

    Marquis de Lafayette Statue

    Hours: Daily before dusk. Exterior view only.

    The statue of Lafayette in Cross Creek Park honors the city’s namesake. Fayetteville shares the distinction of being named for the Revolutionary War hero with other cities and counties. However, Fayetteville, North Carolina, was the very first one to bear his name and the only one that he actually visited. In 1777, at the age of only 19, the Marquis de Lafayette sailed from France to America to join the colonists’ fight for independence from England. He was assigned to George Washington’s staff as a major general and soon proved his valor in the Battle of Brandywine. Washington awarded Lafayette with command of the Virginia army and he played a pivotal in the defeat of Cornwallis at Yorktown.

    Ann Street Fayetteville NC 28301

    Hours: Daily before dusk. Exterior view only. The statue of Lafayette in Cross Creek Park honors the city's namesake. Fayetteville shares the distinction of being named for the Revolutionary War hero with other cities and counties. However,...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  • YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE TRAIL

    Flora MacDonald Historical Marker

    Near this spot the Scottish heroine bade farewell to her husband, Allan MacDonald of Kingsburgh, and his troops during the march-out of the Highlanders to the Battle of Moores Creek Bridge, February 1776.

    This marker was placed by the Cumberland County Historical Society.

    North Cool Spring Street Fayetteville NC 28301

    Near this spot the Scottish heroine bade farewell to her husband, Allan MacDonald of Kingsburgh, and his troops during the march-out of the Highlanders to the Battle of Moores Creek Bridge, February 1776. This marker was placed by the Cumberland...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  • YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE TRAIL

    Fayetteville Area Convention and Visitors Bureau (FACVB)

    Hours: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.;

    Open to the public

    The Fayetteville Area Convention and Visitors Bureau (FACVB) positions Fayetteville and  Cumberland County as a destination for conventions, tournaments, and individual travel. Operating a Visitors Center with a drive-through window. The FACVB is located just minutes from the heart of downtown. Signs from I-95 provide clear directions to the Visitor Center. Call for information and help planning your visit to the area or stop by when you arrive for maps, brochures and more.

    245 Person Street Fayetteville NC 28301

    VISIT WEBSITE

    (910) 483-5311

    Hours: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Open to the public The Fayetteville Area Convention and Visitors Bureau (FACVB) positions Fayetteville and  Cumberland County as a destination for conventions, tournaments, and individual travel....(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

THE STOPS

  1. Old Bluff Church and Cemetery
    YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE TRAIL

    Old Bluff Church and Cemetery

    Exterior View or By Appointment Only. Daily before Dusk.

    This graveyard is one of the oldest in Cumberland County. It is located adjacent to Old Bluff Church, which was organized in 1758. Both are located on the high east bank of the Cape Fear River. Colonel Alexander McCalister, a leading County patriot during the Revolutionary War, is buried here. He came to North Carolina in 1740 from Scotland and quickly became a great patriot and a prominent figure in North Carolina, becoming a member of the N.C. Senate in 1787. A monument commemorates his many achievements.

    Old Bluff Church Road Wade NC 28395

    (910) 891-5019

    Exterior View or By Appointment Only. Daily before Dusk. This graveyard is one of the oldest in Cumberland County. It is located adjacent to Old Bluff Church, which was organized in 1758. Both are located on the high east bank of the Cape...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  2. Liberty Point
    YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE TRAIL

    Liberty Point

    Hours: Daily before dusk. Exterior view only.

    Near this site in June 1775, a group of fifty-five patriots signed a document of freedom, known as the “Liberty Point Resolves”, one year before the Declaration of Independence was signed. A granite marker commemorates their pledge to the cause of Independence and lists fifty-five signers names. Liberty Point is not only a locally cherished historical area but also a vestige of early street patterns with its notable triangular plot.

    Person and Bow Streets Fayetteville NC 28301

    (800) 255-8217

    Hours: Daily before dusk. Exterior view only. Near this site in June 1775, a group of fifty-five patriots signed a document of freedom, known as the "Liberty Point Resolves", one year before the Declaration of Independence was signed. A granite...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  3. Fifer’s Grave
    YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE TRAIL

    Fifer’s Grave

    Hours: Daily before dusk. Exterior view only.

    The African-American fifer Isaac Hammond lies buried here. Hammond became the first fifer in the Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry and served 30 years. He also served in the 10th NC Regiment Continental Line during the Revolutionary War. He became a barber in town and was active in politics even though blacks were not permitted to vote at the time.

    North Cool Spring Street Fayetteville, NC 28301

    Hours: Daily before dusk. Exterior view only. The African-American fifer Isaac Hammond lies buried here. Hammond became the first fifer in the Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry and served 30 years. He also served in the 10th NC Regiment...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  4. Museum of the Cape Fear Historical Complex
    YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE TRAIL

    Museum of the Cape Fear Historical Complex

    Hours: Sunday, 1 – 5 p.m.; Tuesday – Saturday, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Closed on Monday. Open to the public.

    Nearly 400 years of history is retold at the Museum of the Cape Fear Historical Complex. The museum’s exhibits provide a larger context to the patriotism and revolutionary activity that occurred in southern North Carolina. The story of patriotism in this area, however, is made more interesting by the presence of Scottish Highlanders, who settled this area beginning in the 1730s. They took a loyalty oath prior to immigrating to the colonies, and the American Revolution divided their loyalties between the desire for independence and their status as British subjects who swore allegiance to the king. These divided loyalties were tested at the Battle of Moore’s Creek Bridge where Scottish patriots met and defeated Scottish Tories. After the Revolution, the State House, in Fayetteville would be the site where North Carolina delegates ratified the U.S. Constitution, making North Carolina the twelfth state to join the Union. A large relief mural of the State House is unique to see.

    A visit through the museum’s American Revolution gallery lifts history from the pages of text books and places you in the midst of the events. The museum’s exhibit creates a clearer understanding of American Independence in the Cape Fear region.

    801 Arsenal Avenue Fayetteville NC 28305

    VISIT WEBSITE

    (910) 486-1330

    Hours: Sunday, 1 - 5 p.m.; Tuesday - Saturday, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Closed on Monday. Open to the public. Nearly 400 years of history is retold at the Museum of the Cape Fear Historical Complex. The museum's exhibits provide a larger context...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  5. Cross Creek Cemetery
    YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE TRAIL

    Cross Creek Cemetery

    Exterior View Only. Open Daily Dawn to Dusk.

    The oldest public cemetery in Fayetteville, containing over 1,100 grave markers is the burial ground for early settlers and locally significant persons in Fayetteville’s history. This cemetery contains graves of Revolutionary War veterans, including the notable Revolutionary War hero Robert Rowan. He was the leading town patriot as well as the organizer and a signer of the “Liberty Point Resolves”. His burial site is marked by a tall stone monument.

    North Cool Spring Street and Grove Street Fayetteville NC 28301

    (910) 433-1457

    Exterior View Only. Open Daily Dawn to Dusk. The oldest public cemetery in Fayetteville, containing over 1,100 grave markers is the burial ground for early settlers and locally significant persons in Fayetteville's history. This cemetery...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  6. Cornwallis Historical Marker
    YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE TRAIL

    Cornwallis Historical Marker

    Marching to Wilmington after the Battle of Guilford
    Courthouse, stopped with his army in this town in April 1781.

    Green Street in Fayetteville

    Marching to Wilmington after the Battle of Guilford Courthouse, stopped with his army in this town in April 1781....(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  7. Moore’s Camp Historical Marker
    YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE TRAIL

    Moore’s Camp Historical Marker

    Prior to the Battle of Moores Creek Bridge, forces of Gen. James Moore, Whig commander, camped, Feb. 15-21, 1776, 1 1/2 miles northeast.

    NC 87 South of Fayetteville (at Butler Nursery Road)

    Prior to the Battle of Moores Creek Bridge, forces of Gen. James Moore, Whig commander, camped, Feb. 15-21, 1776, 1 1/2 miles northeast....(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  8. Marquis de Lafayette Statue
    YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE TRAIL

    Marquis de Lafayette Statue

    Hours: Daily before dusk. Exterior view only.

    The statue of Lafayette in Cross Creek Park honors the city’s namesake. Fayetteville shares the distinction of being named for the Revolutionary War hero with other cities and counties. However, Fayetteville, North Carolina, was the very first one to bear his name and the only one that he actually visited. In 1777, at the age of only 19, the Marquis de Lafayette sailed from France to America to join the colonists’ fight for independence from England. He was assigned to George Washington’s staff as a major general and soon proved his valor in the Battle of Brandywine. Washington awarded Lafayette with command of the Virginia army and he played a pivotal in the defeat of Cornwallis at Yorktown.

    Ann Street Fayetteville NC 28301

    Hours: Daily before dusk. Exterior view only. The statue of Lafayette in Cross Creek Park honors the city's namesake. Fayetteville shares the distinction of being named for the Revolutionary War hero with other cities and counties. However,...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  9. Flora MacDonald Historical Marker
    YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE TRAIL

    Flora MacDonald Historical Marker

    Near this spot the Scottish heroine bade farewell to her husband, Allan MacDonald of Kingsburgh, and his troops during the march-out of the Highlanders to the Battle of Moores Creek Bridge, February 1776.

    This marker was placed by the Cumberland County Historical Society.

    North Cool Spring Street Fayetteville NC 28301

    Near this spot the Scottish heroine bade farewell to her husband, Allan MacDonald of Kingsburgh, and his troops during the march-out of the Highlanders to the Battle of Moores Creek Bridge, February 1776. This marker was placed by the Cumberland...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  10. Fayetteville Area Convention and Visitors Bureau (FACVB)
    YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE TRAIL

    Fayetteville Area Convention and Visitors Bureau (FACVB)

    Hours: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.;

    Open to the public

    The Fayetteville Area Convention and Visitors Bureau (FACVB) positions Fayetteville and  Cumberland County as a destination for conventions, tournaments, and individual travel. Operating a Visitors Center with a drive-through window. The FACVB is located just minutes from the heart of downtown. Signs from I-95 provide clear directions to the Visitor Center. Call for information and help planning your visit to the area or stop by when you arrive for maps, brochures and more.

    245 Person Street Fayetteville NC 28301

    VISIT WEBSITE

    (910) 483-5311

    Hours: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Open to the public The Fayetteville Area Convention and Visitors Bureau (FACVB) positions Fayetteville and  Cumberland County as a destination for conventions, tournaments, and individual travel....(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

American Independence Trail
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