YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS .

Paths, Plank Roads & Planes Trail

YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS

Paths, Plank Roads & Planes Trail

Ride along the “Paths, Plank Roads, and Planes” trail and track the story of development and progress as written through the necessity of transportation. Beginning with early settlements to present day troop movements and deployments, transportation is a vital part of our daily lives. As you travel around, listen for the sounds of automobile traffic where horses once clopped and wagons creaked. Listen for the trains that... MORE

Ride along the “Paths, Plank Roads, and Planes” trail and track the story of development and progress as written through the necessity of transportation. Beginning with early settlements to present day troop movements and deployments, transportation is a vital part of our daily lives. As you travel around, listen for the sounds of automobile traffic where horses once clopped and wagons creaked. Listen for the trains that pass through our city daily. Listen for the aircraft, both military and civilian, as they fly overhead in a sky where once only birds flew. 

Situated at the head of navigation on the Cape Fear River, two colonial settlements, Cross Creek and Campbellton, merged to form Fayetteville. Settlers improved and widened the paths created by native peoples. These paths became the roads by which settlers traveled between villages and towns, conducting business, and tending to legal matters. Horses, wagons and carriages eased the burden of traveling by foot. In March 1770, C. J. Sauthier, a French cartographer, surveyed and drew a “Plan of the Town of Cross Creek,” showing several major roads including a “Road to the Court House” in the nearby village of Campbellton. 

The Cape Fear River remained, however, the major thoroughfare of its day: ships bringing in a variety of cargo, consumable goods, household items, and the settlers themselves. Rivers were important for locating specific landmarks and making main designations. For example, at the confluence of the Lower Little River and the Cape Fear River, Cumberland County established its first county seat. When the State Assembly combined Cross Creek and Campbellton, it pressed town officials to lay out new streets in a “regular and convenient manner.” When Fayetteville became incorporated in 1783, a new town plan, with grid-patterned streets, was laid out with three town squares: James Square, became the site of a new courthouse, Market Square, became the site of the State House (where the Market House currently stands), and St. John’s Square, became the site of Union Lodge (present day Phoenix Masonic Lodge #8). 

In 1818, steamboats began plying the Cape Fear River between Fayetteville and the coastal port of Wilmington. The Henrietta, a side-wheel steamer built north of town, took six days on her maiden voyage to go between the two cities. Eventually, she could make the trip in 10 hours. The first bridge in the area was built in 1819. In 1822, a horse-drawn railway transported cargo from the river up to Market Square. Because the Cape Fear River is the only river in North Carolina that flows directly to the Atlantic Ocean, shipping linked Fayetteville to the rest of the world. While river transportation is credited for the area’s growth and development, the lack of railroads hindered the area’s growth. As long as waterways provided the main method of transportation, Fayetteville thrived. However, once railroads surpassed water transportation as the preferred method of shipping, a major shift began to take place. Around 1830, North Carolina began to build railroads, but unfortunately, Fayetteville was bypassed. Interestingly, plank roads were introduced into the area and nicknamed the “Farmer’s Railroad” because of the ease it afforded farmers for transporting their crops, and other sellable goods, to market. 

All of the state’s major plank roads converged on Fayetteville because of its importance as a marketplace, maintaining its economic viability. Plank roads consisted of various constructions, based on topography (landscape) and resources. In part, these roads were built by slaves who had been hired out by local slave owners. The Fayetteville and Western Plank Road, completed in 1855, became the longest plank road in history (at that time)—129 miles long. Unfortunately, due to the costliness of upkeep, plank roads eventually became obsolete. Meanwhile, attempts had been made to connect Fayetteville by rail through companies such as the Fayetteville and Yadkin Railroad, which never succeeded. In 1852, the Western Railroad managed to build a short line from Fayetteville to Egypt Coal Mine (near present-day Sanford) a distance of 43 miles. In 1879, Western Railroad became a part of the Cape Fear & Yadkin Valley Railroad. This provided long-awaited connections to various other railroads in North Carolina Fayetteville’s link to the rest of the world now included rail traffic. 

In 1902, Fayetteville witnessed its first automobile. In 1913, the county’s first “graded” road linked Fayetteville with Hope Mills. Enough automobiles could be found around town by 1920 to include traffic police in the city’s budget. In one month the Fayetteville Police Department issued 126 warrants for motor vehicle violations. A trolley line, built in 1906, ran from the Haymount Hill residential neighborhood through downtown, past the Market House, and down Gillespie Street ending at the fairgrounds. Automobile traffic helped the area’s economy rebound from the years of no railroad. Fayetteville became known as a half-way point for travelers along the major north/south route between Florida and the northeastern states. In the early 1930s, the proliferation of airline travel put Fayetteville on the map with the construction of an airport on Ramsey Street. Amelia Earhart landed her plane here during one of her many record breaking adventures. Today, the Fayetteville Regional Airport, located off NC Highway 301/Interstate 95 Business, provides a hub for American and Delta Airlines. 

“Paths, Plank Roads, and Planes” reveals how transportation is the common thread that connects you to every time period of the past, helping us to understand and appreciate our present. Enjoy your trek!

Trail Mileage: 100 miles

Time to Complete  2 hours, 30 min (half day trail)

Sites of interest on this trail may be classified in one of three ways: Open to the Public - The site is open to the public for a visit during their operating hours. By Appointment Only - The site is available to visitors anytime by viewing it from the exterior or by calling ahead and making an appointment with its administrators for the site to be opened during your visit. Exterior View Only - The site may only be viewed from the exterior for a visit. Visitors may receive written or audible information about trail sites at the Fayetteville Area Convention and Visitors Bureau through our Customize IT! system.

 


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  • YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS

    Campbellton Landing

    Hours vary upon activity. Open to the public.

    Located on the east bank of the Cape Fear River and is named after the old ferry landing at Campbellton village. Campbellton was one of the first settlements in the area, incorporated in 1762, and located on the west bank of the river. It wasn’t until 1819, that the first bridge crossing the river was constructed to bring people over to the east bank. Confederate breastworks are still visible at Campbellton Landing.

    1130 Person Street Fayetteville NC 28301

    (910) 568-3071

    Hours vary upon activity. Open to the public. Located on the east bank of the Cape Fear River and is named after the old ferry landing at Campbellton village. Campbellton was one of the first settlements in the area, incorporated in 1762,...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  • YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS

    Museum of the Cape Fear Historical Complex

    Hours: Sunday, 1 – 5 p.m.; Tuesday – Saturday, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Closed on Monday. Open to the public.

    The Museum of the Cape Fear Historical Complex offers nearly 400 years of history through its exhibits. Ride the trail of history beginning with a 1500 year old dugout canoe used by American Indians from this area. Discover the many modes of transportation that evolved over time. For example, Europeans first arrived in the Cape Fear region in 1524, by sailing vessels. By 1818, steamboats plied the Cape Fear River be – tween Fayetteville and Wilmington. Visitors to the museum can step aboard our steamboat, push a button to operate a toy train, and learn about the abundance of plank roads that kept Fayetteville a viable economic center in the Tar Heel state. The museum’s exhibits provide a larger context by which the visitor will achieve a greater understanding and appreciation for how the wheels of transportation shaped our history.

    801 Arsenal Avenue Fayetteville NC 28305

    VISIT WEBSITE

    (910) 486-1330

    Hours: Sunday, 1 - 5 p.m.; Tuesday - Saturday, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Closed on Monday. Open to the public. The Museum of the Cape Fear Historical Complex offers nearly 400 years of history through its exhibits. Ride the trail of history beginning...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  • YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS

    Fayetteville Area Transportation and Local History Museum

    Hours: Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Fourth Fridays 10 a.m.-10 p.m.; Closed on Sunday and Holidays. Open to Public.

    The museum provides exhibits, media productions, and educational panels that trace Fayetteville/Cumberland County’s transportation history from Native Americans to mid-20th century. All forms of transportation are represented from early trails and river travel, to railroads, cars, aviation, and much more. The museum offers a wide variety of artifacts and archaeological material related to local transportation history. The museum also provides an archive of local history information for researchers. The museum is located in the restored, circa 1890 former Cape Fear and Yadkin Valley Railway Depot.

    325 Franklin Street Fayetteville NC 28301

    VISIT WEBSITE

    (910) 433-1457

    Hours: Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Fourth Fridays 10 a.m.-10 p.m.; Closed on Sunday and Holidays. Open to Public. The museum provides exhibits, media productions, and educational panels that trace Fayetteville/Cumberland County's transportation...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  • YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS

    Market House

    Hours: Exterior view only, Daily before dusk.

    The circa 1832 Market House, which is a designated National Landmark, served as both the Town Hall above and the Market Place below. Commerce, however was not confined to the space under the Town Hall, but included the 200 foot square surrounding it. Goods would arrive from boats on the Cape Fear River as well by wagon from the surrounding back country. The Market House was the hub of antebellum Plank Road construction to include the 129 mile road to Salem. Carts, wagons, and hucksters swarmed into Market Square to buy, sell, and trade goods. In 1982, an archaeological project along Hay Street, near the Market House, revealed portions of the Plank Road, which are included in an exhibit at the Transportation and Local History Museum.

    Person, Hay, Green, Gillespie Streets Fayetteville NC 28301

    Hours: Exterior view only, Daily before dusk. The circa 1832 Market House, which is a designated National Landmark, served as both the Town Hall above and the Market Place below. Commerce, however was not confined to the space under the Town...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  • YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS

    Cross Creek Historical Marker

    Colonial village and trading center, merged in 1778 with town of Campbelton and in 1783 renamed Fayetteville.

    Bow Street at Person Street in Fayetteville

    Colonial village and trading center, merged in 1778 with town of Campbelton and in 1783 renamed Fayetteville....(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  • YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS

    Plank Roads Historical Marker

    Fayetteville was the focal point for five plank roads, chartered 1849-52. The longest was built to Bethania, 129 miles northwest.

    Green Street at Market Square in Fayetteville

    Fayetteville was the focal point for five plank roads, chartered 1849-52. The longest was built to Bethania, 129 miles northwest....(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  • YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS

    82nd Airborne Division War Memorial Museum

    Hours: Tuesday – Saturday 10 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.; Closed on Sunday & Monday; Open to the public.

    Visit the 82d Airborne Division War Memorial Museum and see the aircraft that carry the 82’s paratroopers to faraway battles from the World War II C-47 to today’s C-130. In the museum you will see the parachutes that soldier decent from the clouds and you will see the vehicles and equipment of that the paratroops use once they are on the ground.

    Building C-6841 Ardennes Street Fort Bragg NC 28310

    VISIT WEBSITE

    (910) 432-3443

    Hours: Tuesday - Saturday 10 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.; Closed on Sunday & Monday; Open to the public. Visit the 82d Airborne Division War Memorial Museum and see the aircraft that carry the 82's paratroopers to faraway battles from the World...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  • YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS

    Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Depot

    Hours: Daily before dusk. Exterior view only.

    The Atlantic Coast Line came to Fayetteville in 1892, and by the turn of the twentieth century the town was included in main north-south passenger and freight services. This depot is listed on the National Register of Historic Places for its architectural merit featuring a Colonial Dutch Revival style.

    472 Hay Street Fayetteville NC 28301

    (910) 483-2658

    Hours: Daily before dusk. Exterior view only. The Atlantic Coast Line came to Fayetteville in 1892, and by the turn of the twentieth century the town was included in main north-south passenger and freight services. This depot is listed on...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  • YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS

    Fayetteville Area Convention and Visitors Bureau (FACVB)

    Hours: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.;

    Open to the public

    The Fayetteville Area Convention and Visitors Bureau (FACVB) positions Fayetteville and  Cumberland County as a destination for conventions, tournaments, and individual travel. Operating a Visitors Center with a drive-through window. The FACVB is located just minutes from the heart of downtown. Signs from I-95 provide clear directions to the Visitor Center. Call for information and help planning your visit to the area or stop by when you arrive for maps, brochures and more.

    245 Person Street Fayetteville NC 28301

    VISIT WEBSITE

    (910) 483-5311

    Hours: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Open to the public The Fayetteville Area Convention and Visitors Bureau (FACVB) positions Fayetteville and  Cumberland County as a destination for conventions, tournaments, and individual travel....(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  • YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS

    Sandhills Family Heritage Center/Farmers Market

    Hours: Exterior view only or by appointment, daily before dusk.

    An exhibit on plank roads exists on the grounds and is used to tell the story of slave labor that helped build them. Formerly called the Spring Lake Civic Center, it was founded by African Americans as a recreational facility for local black youth in 1951. The center was used for youth and adult social gatherings such as family reunions, birthday parties, and during the 1960s as a civil rights meeting place. Plans are underway to restore the building as an African American Heritage Center by the Sandhills Family Heritage Association which frequently hosts events and tours here about African American Heritage.

    310 Green Street Fayetteville NC 28301

    VISIT WEBSITE

    (910) 568-5809

    Hours: Exterior view only or by appointment, daily before dusk. An exhibit on plank roads exists on the grounds and is used to tell the story of slave labor that helped build them. Formerly called the Spring Lake Civic Center, it was founded...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  • YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS

    Averasboro Battlefield

    Hours: Tuesday – Saturday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Open to the public.

    Relive the Civil War Battle of Averasboro (March 15-16, 1865) as you visit the Battlefield museum, battle grounds, and Confederate cemetery. Also learn about the Smith’s, the family that owned the 8,000 acre plantation where the battle was fought.

    3300 Highway 82 Dunn NC 28335

    VISIT WEBSITE

    (910) 891-5019

    Hours: Tuesday - Saturday, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Open to the public. Relive the Civil War Battle of Averasboro (March 15-16, 1865) as you visit the Battlefield museum, battle grounds, and Confederate cemetery. Also learn about the Smith's, the...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  • YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS

    Averasboro Battlefield and Museum

    Hours: Tuesday – Saturday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Open to the public.

    Explore the history of the Battle of Averasboro (March 15- 16, 1865) when you visit the museum, the battleground, and cemetery. Also learn about the Smith family who owned the 8,000 acre plantation where the battle was fought.

    3300 Highway 82 Dunn NC 28334

    VISIT WEBSITE

    (910) 891-5019

    Hours: Tuesday - Saturday, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Open to the public. Explore the history of the Battle of Averasboro (March 15- 16, 1865) when you visit the museum, the battleground, and cemetery. Also learn about the Smith family who owned...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

THE STOPS

  1. Campbellton Landing
    YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS

    Campbellton Landing

    Hours vary upon activity. Open to the public.

    Located on the east bank of the Cape Fear River and is named after the old ferry landing at Campbellton village. Campbellton was one of the first settlements in the area, incorporated in 1762, and located on the west bank of the river. It wasn’t until 1819, that the first bridge crossing the river was constructed to bring people over to the east bank. Confederate breastworks are still visible at Campbellton Landing.

    1130 Person Street Fayetteville NC 28301

    (910) 568-3071

    Hours vary upon activity. Open to the public. Located on the east bank of the Cape Fear River and is named after the old ferry landing at Campbellton village. Campbellton was one of the first settlements in the area, incorporated in 1762,...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  2. Museum of the Cape Fear Historical Complex
    YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS

    Museum of the Cape Fear Historical Complex

    Hours: Sunday, 1 – 5 p.m.; Tuesday – Saturday, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Closed on Monday. Open to the public.

    The Museum of the Cape Fear Historical Complex offers nearly 400 years of history through its exhibits. Ride the trail of history beginning with a 1500 year old dugout canoe used by American Indians from this area. Discover the many modes of transportation that evolved over time. For example, Europeans first arrived in the Cape Fear region in 1524, by sailing vessels. By 1818, steamboats plied the Cape Fear River be – tween Fayetteville and Wilmington. Visitors to the museum can step aboard our steamboat, push a button to operate a toy train, and learn about the abundance of plank roads that kept Fayetteville a viable economic center in the Tar Heel state. The museum’s exhibits provide a larger context by which the visitor will achieve a greater understanding and appreciation for how the wheels of transportation shaped our history.

    801 Arsenal Avenue Fayetteville NC 28305

    VISIT WEBSITE

    (910) 486-1330

    Hours: Sunday, 1 - 5 p.m.; Tuesday - Saturday, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Closed on Monday. Open to the public. The Museum of the Cape Fear Historical Complex offers nearly 400 years of history through its exhibits. Ride the trail of history beginning...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  3. Fayetteville Area Transportation and Local History Museum
    YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS

    Fayetteville Area Transportation and Local History Museum

    Hours: Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Fourth Fridays 10 a.m.-10 p.m.; Closed on Sunday and Holidays. Open to Public.

    The museum provides exhibits, media productions, and educational panels that trace Fayetteville/Cumberland County’s transportation history from Native Americans to mid-20th century. All forms of transportation are represented from early trails and river travel, to railroads, cars, aviation, and much more. The museum offers a wide variety of artifacts and archaeological material related to local transportation history. The museum also provides an archive of local history information for researchers. The museum is located in the restored, circa 1890 former Cape Fear and Yadkin Valley Railway Depot.

    325 Franklin Street Fayetteville NC 28301

    VISIT WEBSITE

    (910) 433-1457

    Hours: Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Fourth Fridays 10 a.m.-10 p.m.; Closed on Sunday and Holidays. Open to Public. The museum provides exhibits, media productions, and educational panels that trace Fayetteville/Cumberland County's transportation...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  4. Market House
    YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS

    Market House

    Hours: Exterior view only, Daily before dusk.

    The circa 1832 Market House, which is a designated National Landmark, served as both the Town Hall above and the Market Place below. Commerce, however was not confined to the space under the Town Hall, but included the 200 foot square surrounding it. Goods would arrive from boats on the Cape Fear River as well by wagon from the surrounding back country. The Market House was the hub of antebellum Plank Road construction to include the 129 mile road to Salem. Carts, wagons, and hucksters swarmed into Market Square to buy, sell, and trade goods. In 1982, an archaeological project along Hay Street, near the Market House, revealed portions of the Plank Road, which are included in an exhibit at the Transportation and Local History Museum.

    Person, Hay, Green, Gillespie Streets Fayetteville NC 28301

    Hours: Exterior view only, Daily before dusk. The circa 1832 Market House, which is a designated National Landmark, served as both the Town Hall above and the Market Place below. Commerce, however was not confined to the space under the Town...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  5. Cross Creek Historical Marker
    YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS

    Cross Creek Historical Marker

    Colonial village and trading center, merged in 1778 with town of Campbelton and in 1783 renamed Fayetteville.

    Bow Street at Person Street in Fayetteville

    Colonial village and trading center, merged in 1778 with town of Campbelton and in 1783 renamed Fayetteville....(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  6. Plank Roads Historical Marker
    YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS

    Plank Roads Historical Marker

    Fayetteville was the focal point for five plank roads, chartered 1849-52. The longest was built to Bethania, 129 miles northwest.

    Green Street at Market Square in Fayetteville

    Fayetteville was the focal point for five plank roads, chartered 1849-52. The longest was built to Bethania, 129 miles northwest....(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  7. 82nd Airborne Division War Memorial Museum
    YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS

    82nd Airborne Division War Memorial Museum

    Hours: Tuesday – Saturday 10 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.; Closed on Sunday & Monday; Open to the public.

    Visit the 82d Airborne Division War Memorial Museum and see the aircraft that carry the 82’s paratroopers to faraway battles from the World War II C-47 to today’s C-130. In the museum you will see the parachutes that soldier decent from the clouds and you will see the vehicles and equipment of that the paratroops use once they are on the ground.

    Building C-6841 Ardennes Street Fort Bragg NC 28310

    VISIT WEBSITE

    (910) 432-3443

    Hours: Tuesday - Saturday 10 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.; Closed on Sunday & Monday; Open to the public. Visit the 82d Airborne Division War Memorial Museum and see the aircraft that carry the 82's paratroopers to faraway battles from the World...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  8. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Depot
    YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS

    Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Depot

    Hours: Daily before dusk. Exterior view only.

    The Atlantic Coast Line came to Fayetteville in 1892, and by the turn of the twentieth century the town was included in main north-south passenger and freight services. This depot is listed on the National Register of Historic Places for its architectural merit featuring a Colonial Dutch Revival style.

    472 Hay Street Fayetteville NC 28301

    (910) 483-2658

    Hours: Daily before dusk. Exterior view only. The Atlantic Coast Line came to Fayetteville in 1892, and by the turn of the twentieth century the town was included in main north-south passenger and freight services. This depot is listed on...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  9. Fayetteville Area Convention and Visitors Bureau (FACVB)
    YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS

    Fayetteville Area Convention and Visitors Bureau (FACVB)

    Hours: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.;

    Open to the public

    The Fayetteville Area Convention and Visitors Bureau (FACVB) positions Fayetteville and  Cumberland County as a destination for conventions, tournaments, and individual travel. Operating a Visitors Center with a drive-through window. The FACVB is located just minutes from the heart of downtown. Signs from I-95 provide clear directions to the Visitor Center. Call for information and help planning your visit to the area or stop by when you arrive for maps, brochures and more.

    245 Person Street Fayetteville NC 28301

    VISIT WEBSITE

    (910) 483-5311

    Hours: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Open to the public The Fayetteville Area Convention and Visitors Bureau (FACVB) positions Fayetteville and  Cumberland County as a destination for conventions, tournaments, and individual travel....(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  10. Sandhills Family Heritage Center/Farmers Market
    YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS

    Sandhills Family Heritage Center/Farmers Market

    Hours: Exterior view only or by appointment, daily before dusk.

    An exhibit on plank roads exists on the grounds and is used to tell the story of slave labor that helped build them. Formerly called the Spring Lake Civic Center, it was founded by African Americans as a recreational facility for local black youth in 1951. The center was used for youth and adult social gatherings such as family reunions, birthday parties, and during the 1960s as a civil rights meeting place. Plans are underway to restore the building as an African American Heritage Center by the Sandhills Family Heritage Association which frequently hosts events and tours here about African American Heritage.

    310 Green Street Fayetteville NC 28301

    VISIT WEBSITE

    (910) 568-5809

    Hours: Exterior view only or by appointment, daily before dusk. An exhibit on plank roads exists on the grounds and is used to tell the story of slave labor that helped build them. Formerly called the Spring Lake Civic Center, it was founded...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  11. Averasboro Battlefield
    YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS

    Averasboro Battlefield

    Hours: Tuesday – Saturday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Open to the public.

    Relive the Civil War Battle of Averasboro (March 15-16, 1865) as you visit the Battlefield museum, battle grounds, and Confederate cemetery. Also learn about the Smith’s, the family that owned the 8,000 acre plantation where the battle was fought.

    3300 Highway 82 Dunn NC 28335

    VISIT WEBSITE

    (910) 891-5019

    Hours: Tuesday - Saturday, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Open to the public. Relive the Civil War Battle of Averasboro (March 15-16, 1865) as you visit the Battlefield museum, battle grounds, and Confederate cemetery. Also learn about the Smith's, the...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

  12. Averasboro Battlefield and Museum
    YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THAT IS

    Averasboro Battlefield and Museum

    Hours: Tuesday – Saturday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Open to the public.

    Explore the history of the Battle of Averasboro (March 15- 16, 1865) when you visit the museum, the battleground, and cemetery. Also learn about the Smith family who owned the 8,000 acre plantation where the battle was fought.

    3300 Highway 82 Dunn NC 28334

    VISIT WEBSITE

    (910) 891-5019

    Hours: Tuesday - Saturday, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Open to the public. Explore the history of the Battle of Averasboro (March 15- 16, 1865) when you visit the museum, the battleground, and cemetery. Also learn about the Smith family who owned...(visit trails.visitfayettevillenc.com for full description)

    LANDMARK

Paths, Plank Roads & Planes Trail
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